On April 28, 2021

Successful hunters can report turkeys online or at a reporting station this season

By John Hall, VTF&W
Vermont Fish & Wildlife re-established our native wild turkeys when it released 31 wild birds from New York in 1969 and 1970. Today, Vermont has an estimated wild turkey population of more than 45,000.

May 1-31— A successful hunter in Vermont’s May 1-31 spring turkey season must, by law, report their turkey within 48 hours to the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Dept. The department says hunters can report their turkey online through its website vtfishandwildlife.com or at local big game reporting stations.

“Online reporting was used successfully last year,” said turkey biologist Chris Bernier. “It is convenient for the hunter, and the information collected has proven to be just as valuable for monitoring and managing wild turkey populations.”

The information needed to report turkeys online is the same as what has been traditionally collected at big game reporting stations including license, tag and contact information, harvest details, and biological measurements.

There are a few things hunters can do in advance to make submitting a report easier such as having their Conservation ID Number handy (located on their license), knowing what town and Wildlife Management Unit the bird was harvested in, and completing all the necessary measurements such as beard and spur lengths, and weight.

Although not required, the department also requests that hunters use the online reporting tool to upload a digital photo showing the bird’s beard and properly tagged leg. Hunters who provide a valid email address will receive a confirmation email when they successfully submit a turkey harvest report using this new online reporting tool.

The department reminds hunters to wear a face covering and practice social distancing if they bring their turkey to a reporting station. 

Vermont’s big game reporting stations are listed under “Hunt” on the left side of Vermont Fish & Wildlife’s website home page: vtfishandwildlife.com.

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