On April 7, 2021

Gov. Scott introduces plan for $1 billion economic recovery

Governor Phil Scott and his administration presented a plan, Tuesday, April 6, to strategically invest $1 billion in one-time federal money provided to states to jumpstart recovery from the Coronavirus pandemic and support long-term economic growth.

Adhering to the principles set in his Fiscal Year 2022 budget, presented in January, the package makes historic investments in projects and initiatives to address long-standing challenges and unaddressed needs, putting communities across the state on a path for recovery and setting course for a stronger economic future in every region.

Additionally, the Administration’s proposals ensure the one-time federal money — which is not permanent, ongoing funding — is dedicated to one-time transformations rather than programs the State would have to continue to support with other sources of funding once this federal money is gone.

“This federal money provides an incredible opportunity to tackle some of our biggest problems that we haven’t been able to fully address in the past decade and put ourselves on a path to greater prosperity in the future,” said Gov. Scott. “By investing in infrastructure, broadband and housing we can increase economic equity from region to region, helping communities across the state attract more jobs, families and private investment. With these initiatives, along with funds to ensure good jobs remain in Vermont, we can help create more opportunities for our kids, workers and families in every region.”

Through the American Recovery Plan Act (ARPA), Vermont received $1,029,500,000, which it has until December 2024 to allocate. The administration’s plan recommends using the funds in five strategic categories:

  1. $250.5 million for broadband and wireless connectivity
  2. $249 million for housing
  3. $200 million for climate change mitigation measures
  4. $170 million for water and sewer infrastructure
  5. $143 million for further economic development and recovery

The proposal also includes $17 million to cover administration and successful deployment of funds.

“We are pleased to offer the Legislature this starting point, which sets priorities that will help make sure we see the maximum value from every dollar of this one-time federal funding, and put ourselves in a position to grow the economy, make Vermont more affordable and protect the most vulnerable,” added Scott.

Do you want to submit feedback to the editor?

Send Us An Email!

Related Posts

Gov. Scott vetoes bill that would’ve restricted bee-killing pesticide

May 22, 2024
Staff report On Monday, May 20, World Bee Day, Gov. Phil Scott vetoed legislation meant to protect bees and other pollinators from a widely-used neuorotoxic pesticide. The bill (H.706) would  eliminate most uses of neonicotinoid pesticides (neonics) in Vermont, which have been associated with alarming losses of managed and wild bee populations. Neonic insecticides are used on…

Health premium increases of 16%-19% projected for 2025

May 22, 2024
Vermonters are again facing steep upward premium growth for 2025 due to the cumulative impact of hospital costs, drug prices and state health care policy choices. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont projects that these trends will continue and will require rate increases of 16.3% for individual health plans and 19.1% for the small group…

Sanders: weight loss drugs could bankrupt U.S. health care

May 22, 2024
As part of his investigation into the outrageously high price of Ozempic and Wegovy in the U.S., U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee, released a stunning new report May 15 exposing the potential of weight loss drugs to bankrupt American health care. In the report, HELP…

The future of fertilizer? Pee, says this Brattleboro institute

May 22, 2024
By Kate Kampner, Community News Service Editor’s note: The Community News Service is a program in which University of Vermont students work with professional editors to provide content for local news outlets at no cost. When Peter Stickney walks along his cow paddocks in the morning, he notes the scattered patches of greener grass across the…