On November 27, 2019

$5 Christmas trees available from the Green Mountain National Forest

Fourth-graders can redeem a voucher for a free tree

RUTLAND—U.S. Forest Service officials in Vermont are encouraging the public to purchase Christmas tree removal permits should they be interested in a $5 tree for the holidays, according to a Nov. 18, news release.

In addition, this year, all fourth graders can again take advantage of the Every Kid Outdoors initiative and get a free Christmas tree voucher, found at everykidoutdoors.gov. Fourth graders that present a printed copy of the voucher may redeem it for an Every Kid Outdoors Pass and a Christmas tree removal permit at one of the U.S. Forest offices listed below. This is a one-time opportunity to cut down a Christmas tree on national forest land during the 2019 holiday season. Christmas trees for personal use may be cut on the Green Mountain National Forest, subject to the following conditions:

A “Christmas Tree Removal” permit must be purchased ($5) at one of the Forest Service offices located in Rutland, Manchester Center, or Rochester.

The permit must be attached to the tree before transporting it from the site where it was cut.

The permit holder is responsible for knowing that the tree comes from Forest Service land. Maps are available when you purchase your permit.

Trees over 20 feet tall are not designated for cutting by the Christmas tree permit.

The height of the tree stump left after a tree has been cut should be six inches or less above the soil.

Christmas trees shall not be cut in active timber sales, wilderness areas, campgrounds, picnic areas, or within 25 feet of any Forest Service, town, or state maintained road.

Only one Christmas tree permit will be issued per household per year.

Permits are not refundable.

Trees obtained under the Christmas tree permit may not be resold.

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