On November 13, 2019

Hunting season begins Nov. 16

Hunting season. Photo Kalkomey

Hunters urged to wear orange

Vermont Fish and Wildlife is reminding hunters to wear fluorescent hunter orange.

“Hunting is one of the safest outdoor activities, and it’s getting safer thanks to advances in education as well as science,” said Nicole Meier, Vermont Fish and Wildlife information and education specialist.  “Our volunteer hunter education instructors stress that wearing orange during hunting season is important, and studies prove that wearing fluorescent hunter orange keeps hunters visible to other people in the woods, but it keeps them relatively invisible to deer.”

“Every year we should strive to be the safest we can be by wearing at least a hunter orange hat and vest,” she added.

Meier says hunters moving into the line of fire of other hunters and mistaking other hunters for game are common causes of the state’s accidents.

The time that deer are most active, during the dawn and dusk hours, are times of especially low visibility.  You can improve your chances of being seen by other hunters by wearing hunter orange, which can be seen even in low-light situations.

“While it isn’t recommended to wear orange during waterfowl and turkey seasons, we certainly still recommend hunter orange when you are going to and from your blind, treestand or calling spot,” said Meier.

While some hunters might be concerned that deer are scared by hunter orange, in fact deer have been shown to be unaffected by the color.  A deer’s vision is based on movement, patterns and color variations.  Unlike humans, deer do not have multiple color receptors in their eyes.   They can see color, but their spectrum is limited.  This means deer must rely heavily on their ability to detect movement over the ability to interpret color variations and patterns.

Hunting in Vermont continues to be a safe recreational pursuit and hunters can help keep it that way by choosing to wear hunter orange.

Hunt smart. Hunt safe. Wear orange.

Do you want to submit feedback to the editor?

Send Us An Email!

Related Posts

Large turnout for Hartland school budget info session

May 23, 2024
By Curt Peterson The May 21 Hartland school budget information session may be the best-attended school board gathering in recent history — an estimated 40 people attended in person at Damon Hall in Hartland, and another 41 tuned in online. Hartland voters had already approved the $11,040,567 budget 320-311 on April 2. But a petition…

United Way of Rutland County names new exc. director

May 22, 2024
The United Way of Rutland County (UWRC) announced the appointment of Tina Van Guilder as its new executive director, May 17.  Van Guilder officially assumed her role as executive director May 6. With over seven years of direct non-profit leadership experience in the Rutland County area, coupled with recent roles focusing on grant coordination, budget…

20 degrees above average: May temps soar

May 22, 2024
By Erin Petenko/VTDigger Vermont is forecast to hit temperatures in the upper 80s Tuesday and Wednesday, far above normal for this time of year, the Vermont branch of the National Weather Service reported on Monday, May 20. Parts of the state, particularly the Champlain Valley down to Rutland in the west and the Connecticut River Valley regions to…

Gov. Scott vetoes bill that would’ve restricted bee-killing pesticide

May 22, 2024
Staff report On Monday, May 20, World Bee Day, Gov. Phil Scott vetoed legislation meant to protect bees and other pollinators from a widely-used neuorotoxic pesticide. The bill (H.706) would  eliminate most uses of neonicotinoid pesticides (neonics) in Vermont, which have been associated with alarming losses of managed and wild bee populations. Neonic insecticides are used on…