News Briefs
June 21, 2017

Lakes Region News Briefs

Castleton/Hubbardton school district weighs needed repairs

Maintenance Chief Jim Fowler told the Castleton/Hubbardton School Board June 7 that the school district needs to replace its leaking, 40-year-old steam kettle and upgrade the 48-year-old walk-in cooler’s refrigeration system. Another concern is that the floor of the garage is failing. Fowler will seek three quotes for its repair to bring to the School Board meeting at the end of the month.

Other well-used items will also need to be replaced or repaired in the future. Financial Director Cheryl Scarziello suggested that it would be wise for a professional to examine equipment at the schools throughout the district with an eye to scheduling a replacement/repair plan. Working from a cost analysis, the district could formulate a 25-30 year bond to cover the expected equipment life.

Fowler shared that Superintendent Ron Ryan had drafted a three- and a five-year plan to complete necessary projects that meet safety concerns in building infrastructure. In FY 2019, budgets will be combined under the new unification district and revenues will have to be weighed.

Water line repairs roil town

FAIR HAVEN—The town of Fair Haven has issued a series of notices cautioning that water be boiled before being consumed. A notice on June 14 warned that “there is a strong possibility that your drinking water may become contaminated on its way to the tap.” The Select Board’s May 30 meeting included a water line update that machinery had located “previous work that had not been mapped.”

Fair Haven makes another bid for improvement aid

FAIR HAVEN—The town of Fair Haven resubmitted its request for Village Center designation June 1, Interim Town Manager Jonas Rosenthal told the Rutland Herald. Fair Haven previously held the designation but the designation had lapsed when the town plan did in 2010. Fair Haven adopted an updated town plan last year.

Village Center designation gives property owners the opportunity to participate in taking historic, code improvement, and technology tax credits.

The designation also endows the community with priority consideration for a variety of state grants. Rosenthal outlined the types of grants the community may receive as a result, drawing on funds for downtown transportation, state community development, historic preservation, cultural facilities, and more.

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